Ankarafantsika

La Vallée… …or the colours of Madagascar/ …oder Die Farben Madagaskars (58 pictures)

Ankarafantsika

Ankarafantsika

One of Madagascar’s most fascinating natural areas is located on an ascending ledge in the island’s north-western corner and appears quite unspectacular at first sight. In a dry, undulating and treeless area of the fourth biggest island and second biggest island state after Indonesia, Ankarafantsika is towering approximately 250m above the surrounding landscape. Intersected by Rue Nationale 4 on it’s way to Mahajanga, the National Park is brimming with dense dry forest, which is protected area since the 1920s and a National Park since the 70s.

Dense dry forest - Dichter Trockenwald

Dense dry forest – Dichter Trockenwald

Coquerel-Sifaka enjoying the first rays of sunshine - Ein Coquerel Sifaka genießt die ersten Sonnenstrahlen

Coquerel-Sifaka enjoying the first rays of sunshine – Ein Coquerel Sifaka genießt die ersten Sonnenstrahlen

Chameleon on the prowl - Chamäleon auf der Pirsch

Chameleon on the prowl – Chamäleon auf der Pirsch

There is a camp among impressive giant trees right at the roadside but still in the middle of the forest, where you get a first clue of the diversity of life raving around only a few steps away. It’s clicking and rustling, screaming and singing, screeching and croaking, chirping and warbling the jungle beat and if listening close enough, one can sense African polyrhythm in that symphony of truly musical quality. Even though dry forest is a clear type of forest with little undergrowth, little rain and huge trees giving a lot of shade and therefore less spectacular than rainforests for example, it is still astonishingly dense if standing in the middle of it. Ankarafantsika is bursting with Lemurs, snakes, Chameleons, Tortoises as well as 129 species of birds and enormous crocodiles in Lac Ravelobe. And there are some gigantic Baobab trees of the Adansonia madagascariensis species, the last specimen of their kind. The bird that once had eaten the seeds of those trees is now extinct, but the seeds need the fermentation in the bird’s belly for sprouting. The bird just tasted too good!

The tent & the camp - Das Zelt & das Camp

The tent & the camp – Das Zelt & das Camp

Like all of Madagascar’s natural reserves, Ankarafantsika is extremely popular with biologists because of being a relatively unspoiled and unexplored natural area. At the roadside at the centre of Ankarafantsika, the former forestry station of Ampijoroa (pronounced ampeedjooroo) is now used as the National Park headquarter and accommodation. Starting from there, visitors are able to explore the surrounding area close to the camp on a network of paths, funded also by the German “Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau” (KfW) like the park’s infrastructure in it’s entirety.

The King of Madagascar, the crested drongo - Der König von Madagaskar, der Madagaskar-Drongo

The King of Madagascar, the crested drongo – Der König von Madagaskar, der Madagaskar-Drongo

Malagasy paradise flycatcher - Madagaskar Paradiesschnäpper

Malagasy paradise flycatcher – Madagaskar Paradiesschnäpper

And you’re really in the middle of the action instead of being a non-participant observer. Lemurs like beautiful Coquerel-Sifakas will visit you right at the camp; there are exotic Chameleons and colourful lizards everywhere, not to mention the extremely diverse birdlife. Whether it’s the multicoloured Madagascar kingfisher, the equally flamboyant Malagasy paradise flycatcher or the Madagascan magpie-robin, a relative of the European robin, whether it’s the crested drongo, the so called “King of Madagascar”, the Madagascan hoopoe or the Madagascan fish eagle, which is said to be one of the most endangered bird species on the planet, if you’re lucky, you might be seeing all of them when visiting Ankarafantsika.

Milne-Edwards Sportive Lemur... - Milne-Edwards-Wieselmaki...

Milne-Edwards Sportive Lemur… – Milne-Edwards-Wieselmaki…

...in the warmth of early morning sunshine - ...in der Wärme der ersten Sonnenstrahlen

…in the warmth of early morning sunshine – …in der Wärme der ersten Sonnenstrahlen

Even the chances of stumbling over nocturnal Lemurs aren’t that bad. If you’re really lucky, you can spot them high up in the trees around the camp right after sunset or on a trek with a guide in the early morning hours. Then those cute primates like the Milne-Edwards Sportive Lemur or some Mouse Lemurs – among them the world’s smallest primate – are sitting outside their tree holes or in a well hidden fork of a branch warming their bones in the first rays of sunshine after a chilly night on their search for food before sleeping the day away in their hiding place.

Gray Mouse Lemur - Grauer Mausmaki

Gray Mouse Lemur – Grauer Mausmaki

It’s reasonable, especially for the Mouse Lemurs feeding on fruits, blossoms and leaves as well as small insects, because of less food being available in southern/austral winter. To avoid wasting too much energy, they fall into torpor condition, a kind of brumation where body-temperature and metabolic rate are lowered to a minimum. In the morning they use the warmth of sunshine to rejuvenate.

On the lookout - Ausguck

On the lookout – Ausguck

You looking at me?

You looking at me?

Chameleons also do like it warm, so they are sleeping at night, ignoring the bleakness while hanging on a leaf, in between some branches or in the greenery. Not until sunrise do they get active before searching for food like all the other lizards and snakes in the forest, while the birds start their chanting.

Outdoor Ad #274

Outdoor Ad #274

Blue eyes, Baby´s got blue eyes...

Blue eyes, Baby´s got blue eyes…

Eye circles - Augenringe

Eye circles – Augenringe

On a hike through Ankarafantsika you suddenly reach a well-defined edge of the forest encountering a dry steppe. Before becoming a natural reserve, all the trees in this area had been chopped by the local’s ancestors. All there is left now is a treeless and barren plain with it’s soil being unprotected and at the weather’s mercy. Clumps of grass are still holding it together, but that won’t stop erosion on the long term.

Wood - Holz

Wood – Holz

Another tortoise rescue centre - Noch eine Schildkröten-Rettungsstation

Another tortoise rescue centre – Noch eine Schildkröten-Rettungsstation

Chelonian Captive Breeding Centre

Chelonian Captive Breeding Centre

Not far away from a cell tower the plain suddenly disappears, and you’re looking at „La Vallée“, the valley, how it is called. It’s all about awesome colours and incredible shapes forming a jagged ravine, marking the fringe of Ankarafantsika ledge. Like ceramic splinters, countless crags are towering above yellowish and reddish sand, and on top – just like on a razorblade – even trees and shrubs are growing. The range of colours includes black, grey and green, blue, violet and all kinds of yellow and red, which are the colours that give the place its dominating atmosphere.

Livestock farming at Lac Ravelobe - Viehhaltung am Lac Ravelobe

Livestock farming at Lac Ravelobe – Viehhaltung am Lac Ravelobe

But it’s not as if a permanent river had cut it’s way into and through the rocks; it’s rather an escarpment due to erosion, where the soil got undermined by the waters during rainy season because of the lack of stabilizing root balls. So parts of the ground just collapsed. Some old, experienced guide working at Ankarafantsika for decades told us that the valley appears different to the people after every rain season. It’s constantly changing, and there will come the day, when all those fascinating rock formations will be gone. Up to that point, the valley is going to stay a place like an artist’s form and colour palette. The different types of rock are weathering at a different speed, which lead to those bizarre needles and slabs. A good 100 kilometres northwest in the port town of Mahajanga artists use the area’s colourful sand to create artistically pictures inside of glass bottles – with the colours of Madagascar.

La Vallée I

La Vallée I

La Vallée II

La Vallée II

La Vallée III

La Vallée III

La Vallée IV

La Vallée IV

La Vallée V

La Vallée V

La Vallée VI

La Vallée VI

La Vallée VII

La Vallée VII

Einer der faszinierendsten Naturräume Madagaskars, wo exemplarisch die gesamte Farbpalette der viertgrößten Insel und des nach Indonesien zweitgrößten Inselstaats der Welt erlebt werden kann, erhebt sich erst einmal relativ unspektakulär aus der trockenen, welligen und beinahe baumlosen Landschaft des Nordwestens. Der Nationalpark Ankarafantsika liegt auf einer etwa 250m hohen Platte, durchschnitten von der Nationalstraße 4 in Richtung der Hafenstadt Mahajanga, und ist randvoll mit dichten Trockenwäldern, die bereits seit den 20er Jahren des vergangenen Jahrhunderts unter Schutz stehen und in den 70ern zum Nationalpark erklärt wurden.

Flying study - Flugstudie I

Flying study – Flugstudie I

Flying study - Flugstudie II

Flying study – Flugstudie II

Flying study - Flugstudie III

Flying study – Flugstudie III

Flying study - Flugstudie IV

Flying study – Flugstudie IV

Flying study - Flugstudie V

Flying study – Flugstudie V

Das Camp unter gigantischen Baumriesen direkt an der Straße, aber eben auch mitten im Wald, erzeugt schon eine Ahnung von der Vielfalt des Lebens, das nur wenige Meter entfernt tobt. Es knackst und knistert, schreit und singt, krächzt und quakt, zirpt und trillert, dass es eine rhythmische Freude ist. In dieser Dschungel-Symphonie, die bei längerem Hinhören tatsächlich musikalische Qualitäten hat, ist die afrikanische Polyrhythmik bereits angelegt. Denn auch wenn Trockenwälder als eine lichte Waldform mit wenig Unterholz aufgrund geringer Niederschlagsmengen und hoher, stark beschattender Bäume weniger spektakulär wirken als beispielsweise Regenwälder, sind sie – steht man erst einmal mittendrin – erstaunlich dicht und im Falle von Ankarafantsika vollgestopft mit Lemuren, Schlangen, Chamäleons, Schildkröten sowie insgesamt 129 Vogelarten. Und im Lac Ravelobe inmitten des Waldes leben sogar riesige Krokodile. Und es gibt noch ein paar gigantische Baobabs der Adansonia madagascariensis-Gattung, die letzten ihrer Art. Denn der Vogel, der einst die Samen des Baumes gefressen und durch die Fermentation in seinem Magen zum Keimen beigetragen hat, ist inzwischen ausgestorben. Er schmeckte zu gut!

Last chance to see...

Last chance to see…

...Adansonia perrieri

…Adansonia madagascariensis

Wie alle Naturschutzgebiete Madagaskars ist auch Ankarafantsika besonders beliebt bei Biologen, da bisher nur Teile der Region wirklich eingehend erforscht wurden. Im Zentrum von Ankarafantsika und direkt an der Nationalstraße liegt die frühere Forststation von Ampijoroa (sprich: ampidschuru), wo heute die Nationalparkverwaltung sowie einige Unterkünfte untergebracht sind. Von dort aus kann die nähere Umgebung auf einem Wegenetz, das wie die gesamte Infrastruktur des Parks auch durch Gelder der deutschen Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW) finanziert wurde, erkundet werden.

Coquerel Sifakas - Family morning - Ein Familienmorgen I

Coquerel Sifakas – Family morning – Ein Familienmorgen I

Coquerel Sifakas - Family morning - Ein Familienmorgen II

Coquerel Sifakas – Family morning – Ein Familienmorgen II

Coquerel Sifakas - Family morning - Ein Familienmorgen III

Coquerel Sifakas – Family morning – Ein Familienmorgen III

Dabei ist man mittendrin, statt nur ein distanzierter Zuschauer zu sein. Denn hier kommen Lemuren wie die wunderschönen Coquerel-Sifakas direkt bis ins Camp, überall gibt es für den aufmerksamen Besucher exotische Chamäleons oder prächtig gezeichnete Echsen zu entdecken, ganz zu schweigen von der artenreichen Vogelwelt. Ob der farbenfrohe Madagaskar Eisvogel, der nicht minder auffällige Madagaskar Paradiesschnäpper oder der Madagaskardajal, ein Verwandter unseres Rotkehlchens, ob der Madagaskar-Drongo, der so genannte „König von Madagaskar“, der Madagaskar-Wiedehopf oder der Madagaskar Fischadler, der als eine der seltensten Vogelarten der Welt gilt, sie alle können mit etwas Glück in Ankarafantsika beobachtet werden.

Madagascar kingfisher - Madagaskar Eisvogel

Madagascar kingfisher – Madagaskar Eisvogel

Madagascan magpie-robin - Madagaskardajal

Madagascan magpie-robin – Madagaskardajal

Und selbst die Chancen, auf nachtaktive Lemuren zu treffen, stehen hier nicht schlecht. Die trifft man mit viel Glück nach Sonnenuntergang im Geäst der Bäume rund um die Forststation oder auf einer Wanderung mit einem Guide frühmorgens. Denn dann sitzen putzige Primaten wie der Milne-Edwards-Wieselmaki oder die winzigen Mausmakis – darunter auch der kleinste Primat der Welt – gern am Ausgang einer Baumhöhle oder in gut geschützten Astgabeln, um sich in den ersten Sonnenstrahlen nach einer kühlen Nacht auf Nahrungssuche aufzuwärmen, bevor sie in ihrem Unterschlupf den Tag verschlafen.

Lac Ravelobe

Lac Ravelobe

Madagascan bees - Madagassische Bienen

Madagascan bees – Madagassische Bienen

One palm tree & tons of invasive South American hydrophytes - Eine Palme & Tonnen invasiver südamerikanischer Wasserpflanzen

One palm tree & tons of invasive South American hydrophytes – Eine Palme & Tonnen invasiver südamerikanischer Wasserpflanzen

Gerade für die kleinen Mausmakis, die sich überwiegend von Früchten, Blüten und Blättern, aber auch von Insekten ernähren, ist das durchaus sinnvoll, da das Nahrungsangebot in der Trockenzeit im Südwinter nicht allzu groß ist. Um Energie zu sparen, fallen sie in der Nacht, wenn es zu kalt wird, in den Torpor, eine Kältestarre, in der Körpertemperatur und Stoffwechselrate abgesenkt werden. Morgens lassen sie sich schließlich von der Sonne passiv wieder aufwärmen und so aus der Starre erwecken.

Giant croc - Riesenkroko I

Giant croc – Riesenkroko I

Giant croc - Riesenkroko II

Giant croc – Riesenkroko II

Giant croc - Riesenkroko III

Giant croc – Riesenkroko III

Giant croc - Riesenkroko IV

Giant croc – Riesenkroko IV

Chamäleons mögen es ebenfalls warm, weshalb sie die Nächte schlafend und je nach Größe auf Ästen sitzend, an Blattspitzen hängend oder im Laub verbringen. Morgens werden auch sie aktiv und gehen auf Nahrungssuche wie viele andere Eidechsen und Schlangen im Wald, während allmählich die Vögel ihr Konzert anstimmen.

Bird-nerd´s paradise I

Bird-nerd´s paradise I

Bird-nerd´s paradise II

Bird-nerd´s paradise II

Bird-nerd´s paradise III

Bird-nerd´s paradise III

Bei einer Wanderung durch Ankarafantsika erreicht man irgendwann die unnatürlich scharf gezogene Grenze des Waldes, an der eine karge Steppe beginnt. Bis zu dieser Linie war der Wald vor Einrichtung des Schutzgebiets bereits gerodet worden. Übrig geblieben ist eine kahle Ebene, deren Boden schutzlos Wind und Wetter ausgeliefert ist. Grasbüschel halten den roten Sand noch zusammen, aber aufhalten kann das die Erosion nicht.

The forest with the... - Der Wald mit dem...

The forest with the… – Der Wald mit dem…

...Golden Chameleon - ...Goldenen Chamäleon

…Golden Chameleon – …Goldenen Chamäleon

Here comes the sun

Here comes the sun

Copulating Malagasy ground boas - Kopulierende Madagaskarboas I

Copulating Malagasy ground boas – Kopulierende Madagaskarboas I

Copulating Malagasy ground boas - Kopulierende Madagaskarboas II

Copulating Malagasy ground boas – Kopulierende Madagaskarboas II

Copulating Malagasy ground boas - Kopulierende Madagaskarboas III

Copulating Malagasy ground boas – Kopulierende Madagaskarboas III

Unweit eines Mobilfunkmasts ist diese Ebene dann plötzlich verschwunden, und zu Füßen der Wanderer erstreckt sich „La Vallée“, das Tal, wie es schlicht genannt wird. Unglaubliche Farben und Formen, die eine zerklüftete Schlucht bilden, die an dieser Stelle den Rand der Platte von Ankarafantsika markiert. Wie Keramiksplitter ragen unzählige bunte Felswände aus dem gelben bis roten Sand, und wie auf einer Rasierklinge wachsen obenauf sogar Bäume und Sträucher. Die Farbpalette reicht dabei von Schwarz und Grau über Grün, Blau und Violett bis hin zu allen Schattierungen von Rot und Gelb, die am stärksten vertreten sind.

Breakfast with Coquerel Sifakas - Frühstück mit Coquerel Sifakas I

Breakfast with Coquerel Sifakas – Frühstück mit Coquerel Sifakas I

Breakfast with Coquerel Sifakas - Frühstück mit Coquerel Sifakas II

Breakfast with Coquerel Sifakas – Frühstück mit Coquerel Sifakas II

Breakfast with Coquerel Sifakas - Frühstück mit Coquerel Sifakas III

Breakfast with Coquerel Sifakas – Frühstück mit Coquerel Sifakas III

Doch „La Vallée“ ist weniger ein durch einen permanent fließenden Fluss zustande gekommenes Tal als vielmehr eine erosionsbedingte Abbruchkante, wo der Boden, vom Wasser in der Regenzeit unterspült und bar jedes schützenden, tiefer gehenden Wurzelgeflechts, einfach nachgegeben hat und weggebrochen ist. Ein erfahrener Guide, der bereits seit Jahrzehnten in Ankarafantsika arbeitet, erzählte, dass sich das Aussehen des Tals mit jeder Regenzeit ändere. Irgendwann werden diese faszinierenden Formationen vermutlich verschwunden sein. Solange aber wirkt das Tal gleichermaßen wie eine Farb- und eine Formenpalette eines Künstlers. Die verschiedenen Gesteinsarten verwittern unterschiedlich schnell, was zu den bizarren Nadeln und Tafeln führte, die am Ende übrig blieben. Im gut 100 Kilometer entfernt gelegenen Mahajanga nutzen Künstler den bunten Sand der Region, um kunstvolle Bilder in Flaschen zu kreieren – mit den Farben Madagaskars.

Madagascan fish eagle - Madagaskar Fischadler

Madagascan fish eagle – Madagaskar Fischadler

Advertisements

8 Kommentare zu “Ankarafantsika

  1. Was für eine Vielfalt an Tier- Pflanzen und Landschaftsarten! Wundervolle Fotos und Beschreibungen. Danke schön.

  2. afrikafrau sagt:

    danke fürs “ teilen “ sehr interessanter Beitrag und so…schöne Photos

  3. Maren Wulf sagt:

    Herrliche Bilder!

  4. kutabu sagt:

    Faszinierend! Wunderschöne Bilder!

  5. annicaaktiv sagt:

    Unbelievable what a beautiful nature and animals images you have photographed. There must be a real great experience to be part of such a trip and take photos. I got stuck especially for the beautiful monkeys and the delicious crocodile pattern had, further, it is a delight to the eye and mind to see the scenic surroundings. Nice footage!
    Gute Arbeit! 🙂

Kommentar verfassen

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s