Journey through a mouldering land – Reise durch ein zerfallendes Land

Journey through a mouldering land - Reise durch ein zerfallendes Land

Journey through a mouldering land – Reise durch ein zerfallendes Land

An important ressource rarely taken into account, often disdained and most of the time “tramped on” without bothering much is soil! But that is the surface of this planet, generating life and nutrients as well as keeping everything a-live. Desertification – the ongoing spreading of deserts – and erosion are devastating enormous amounts of soil every year, making a lot of land worthless for every kind of agriculture. And soil is hardly sustainable. If it´s lost, it´s gonna stay that way! Renaturation is fairly difficult and in most cases just impossible.

Crumbling land, western Madagascar - Zerfallendes Land, West-Madagaskar

Crumbling land, western Madagascar – Zerfallendes Land, West-Madagaskar

A journey on the “eighth continent” shows that there is an urgent need for protection, because Madagascar is crumbling all over the place. No matter if north, south, east or west, this southeastern African island, of which many people think like a huge, forest covered habitat for funny furry creatures like the emblematic Aye-Aye, is just bleak in most of it´s places. The demand for wood as a construction material as well as combustibles such as charcoal that is sold in big sacks in villages along the few roads is just too high. In addition to that foreign racketeers – often from China – pay a lot of money to the locals for the illegal logging of rare tropical timber such as rosewood. Nearly every tree and every shrub on Madagascar is rare, endangered and most of them endemic to the island.

From Wood... (southwestern Madagascar) - Vom Holz... (Südwest-Madagaskar)

From Wood… (southwestern Madagascar) – Vom Holz… (Südwest-Madagaskar)

...to charcoal (north of Fianarantsoa) - ...zur Holzkohle (nördlich von Fianarantsoa)

…to charcoal (north of Fianarantsoa) – …zur Holzkohle (nördlich von Fianarantsoa)

The most important livestock in Madagascar is Zebu cattle, a poorly fertile but mythically adored beast with huge horns and a hump. It is pulling the plows on the rice paddies, the carts for transport and it tastes just delicious. Those are the reasons why there are millions of them, but they won´t produce enough milk while demanding a vast amount of food. During dry season they need bark as supplementary feeding, and if the grass of the steppe is turning yellow shepherds are setting it on fire to allow fresh, green grass to grow faster. As obvious, this is an approach that makes any attempt of reforestation rather hopeless.

Through fire to fresh grass - Mit Feuer zu frischem Futter

Through fire to fresh grass (northwestern Madagascar) – Mit Feuer zu frischem Futter (Nordwest-Madagaskar)

Black (southwestern Madagascar) - Schwarz (Südwest-Madagaskar)

Black (southwestern Madagascar) – Schwarz (Südwest-Madagaskar)

It is the last rainforests on the escarpment along Madagascar´s eastcoast that preserve the original structure of the landscape, but the rest of the country is just crumbling away. The dry forest and the spiny forest that used to cover the south, the west and the northwest of the island are gone and no longer able to absorb water of rare precipitation, ground water or condensing moisture during cold nights and there are no roots anymore to prevent erosion. The vulnerable ground is exposed to all kinds of weather conditions; every rainy season is gnawing away at hills and mountains, which develop flaws until becoming unstable and caving in under their own weight.

Caved in (east of Miandrivazo) - Eingestürzt (östlich von Miandrivazo)

Caved in (east of Miandrivazo) – Eingestürzt (östlich von Miandrivazo)

One of the most spectacular examples is found in northwestern Madagascar´s National Park of Ankarafantsika, which is aimed at the conservation of a fascinating piece of dry forest including several species of Lemur, Chameleons, lizards and majestic Baobab trees. Part of the park, which is approximately 250m higher than it´s surroundings, is a kind of savannah where all the trees had been chopped before the installation of the reserve. On it´s edge is “La Vallée” (see first photo), a valley with bizarre rock formations and an incredible range of colours, which makes it one of the park´s main attractions. But besides that, this valley prooves what happens if the ground is exposed to the weather. Mountains, hills, faults, everything is falling apart, and in the end all there is are gentle plains like in northwestern, western and southwestern Madagascar – beautiful to look at, but at the same time empty, dreary and hostile to life.

Plain (southern Madagascar) - Mondlandschaft (Süd-Madagaskar)

Plain (southern Madagascar) – Mondlandschaft (Süd-Madagaskar)

Burnt & falling apart (north of Antananarivo) - Verbrannt & zerfallend (nördlich von Antananarivo)

Burnt & falling apart (north of Antananarivo) – Verbrannt & zerfallend (nördlich von Antananarivo)

Consequences are far-reaching and irreparable. Harvest is decreasing; people sink into poverty, which means that there is stagnation when it comes to the standard of education, because children can´t be sent to school anymore. If there is a loss of cropland, the cost for living is rising what puts more pressure on the people. Beyond that, since the Coup in 2009 the Madegascan tourism industry is faltering because of an increasing crime rate, the ubiquitous corruption, reports about the outbreak of plague in 2014, the Air Madagascar crisis and natural desasters like the devastating cyclone that hit the island early this year. In most parts of the country there ain´t any infrastructure, which won´t do any good to the tourism business neither. If the last remainders of Madagascar´s unique flora and fauna should also go astray, because of deforestation, erosion and in the end plain desertification, it could lead to a straight collapse.

Completely exposed to the weather (southwest of Fianarantsoa) - Wind und Wetter schutzlos ausgeliefert (südwestlich von Fianarantsoa)

Completely exposed to the weather (southwest of Fianarantsoa) – Wind und Wetter schutzlos ausgeliefert (südwestlich von Fianarantsoa)

In order to evolve public as well as political awareness for this acute problem that is present in every single country on this planet, the 68th UN General Assembly declared 2015 the International Year of Soils. Projects have been started and events have been launched to raise public awareness. Through several long-ranging projects/cooperations with the Madegascan government Germany is also engaged in the struggle to save what´s left of the ecosystem of the “eighth continent”, to promote sustainable agriculture in order to protect the country from deforestation and erosion. Let´s hope that it ain´t too late now; personally, I got some doubts.

Crumbling mountains (between Antsirabe and Miandrivazo) - Bröckelnde Berge (zwischen Antsirabe und Miandrivazo)

Crumbling mountains (between Antsirabe and Miandrivazo) – Bröckelnde Berge (zwischen Antsirabe und Miandrivazo)

Eine kaum beachtete, oft gering geschätzte und „mit Füßen getretene“ Ressource sind die Böden, die Oberfläche unseres Planeten, die alles Leben und die Nahrung hervorbringen, die das Leben am selben erhalten. Desertifikation, also die Ausbreitung der Wüsten, und Erosion verschlingen jedes Jahr riesige Flächen, die für jede Bewirtschaftung verloren gehen. Und ein guter Boden ist eine kaum erneuerbare Ressource. Wenn er verloren ist, bleibt er das auch! Renaturierung ist schwierig und oft schlichtweg unmöglich.

Washed-away soil on the way to Morondava - Unterspülte Böden auf dem Weg nach Morondava

Washed-away soil on the way to Morondava – Unterspülte Böden auf dem Weg nach Morondava

Burned-out heart (northwestern Madagascar) - Ausgebranntes Herz (Nordwest-Madagaskar)

Burned-out heart (northwestern Madagascar) – Ausgebranntes Herz (Nordwest-Madagaskar)

Dass der Schutz der Böden dringend notwendig ist, zeigt eine Reise auf dem „achten Kontinent“ überaus deutlich. Denn Madagaskar bröckelt an allen Ecken und Enden. Ob im Norden, Süden, Osten oder Westen, die südostafrikanische Insel, die viele Menschen noch mit endlosen Wäldern voller lustiger Lemuren wie dem Aye-Aye-Fingertier assoziieren, ist in weiten Teil kahl. Zu groß der Bedarf am Baustoff Holz und vor allem am Brennstoff in Form von Holzkohle, die überall in den Dörfern und entlang der wenigen Straßen in großen Säcken angeboten wird. Hinzu kommen ausländische Geschäftemacher – besonders aus China – die den Einheimischen genug Geld für den illegalen Einschlag seltener Hölzer bezahlen. Und eigentlich jeder Baum und jeder Strauch auf Madagaskar ist selten und bedroht, da die meisten auf der Insel endemisch sind, sprich: nur hier vorkommen.

Land clearance in southern Madagascar - Brandrodung in Süd-Madagaskar

Land clearance in southern Madagascar – Brandrodung in Süd-Madagaskar

Older trees are able to survive the grassland fires (Isalo mountains) - Größere Bäume können die Grasbrände überleben (Isalo Gebirge)

Older trees are able to survive the grassland fires (Isalo mountains) – Größere Bäume können die Grasbrände überleben (Isalo Gebirge)

Das wichtigste Nutztier auf Madagaskar ist das Zebu-Rind, ein wenig ertragreiches, aber mythisch verehrtes Wesen, das wichtige Arbeit vor dem Pflug auf den Reisfeldern und vor dem Karren zum Transport leistet und darüber hinaus noch vorzüglich schmeckt. Deshalb gibt es Millionen von ihnen, aber ein Zebu gibt wenig Milch und braucht Unmengen an Futter. In der Trockenzeit wird daher mit Baumrinde zugefüttert, und wenn das Gras der Steppe gelb wird, wird ein Feuer gelegt, damit umso schneller frisches, grünes Futter nachwachsen kann. Ein Vorgehen, das Wiederaufforstung beinahe unmöglich macht.

Dreary and hostile to life (northwestern Madagascar) - Öde und lebensfeindlich (Nordwest-Madagaskar)

Dreary and hostile to life (northwestern Madagascar) – Öde und lebensfeindlich (Nordwest-Madagaskar)

Die letzten Regenwälder an den steilen Hängen entlang der Ostküste sorgen dafür, dass dort die ursprüngliche Landschaftsstruktur erhalten bleibt. Im Rest des Landes dagegen bröckelt und bröselt es unaufhörlich. Die Trocken- oder Dornenwälder, die einst große Teile des Südens, Westens und Nordwestens Madagaskars bedeckten, sind verschwunden und können kein Wasser, sei es das des seltenen Regens, tiefes Grundwasser oder die in den kühlen Nächten kondensierende Luftfeuchtigkeit, mehr binden, keine Böden durch ihr Wurzelgeflecht stabilisieren und so vor Erosion schützen. Die Böden sind Wind und Wetter ausgeliefert, jede Regenzeit nagt an den Hügeln und Bergen, fräst tiefe Schnitte in die Hänge, die irgendwann instabil werden und unter dem eigenen Gewicht einstürzen.

Cracks (east of Miandrivazo) - Risse (östlich von Miandrivazo)

Cracks (east of Miandrivazo) – Risse (östlich von Miandrivazo)

Almost gone (north of Antananarivo) - Schon fast verloren (nördlich von Antananarivo)

Almost gone (north of Antananarivo) – Schon fast verloren (nördlich von Antananarivo)

In spektakulärer Form zu besichtigen ist das im Nationalpark Ankarafantsika im Nordwesten der Insel, wo ein faszinierendes Stück Trockenwald mit zahlreichen Lemurenarten, Chamäleons, Echsen, Vögeln und den majestätischen Baobabs geschützt wird. Teil des Nationalparks, der sich etwa 250 Meter aus der Ebene erhebt, ist auch eine Art Savanne, wo der Wald vor Einrichtung des Schutzgebiets bereits gerodet wurde. An deren Kante liegt „La vallée“ (siehe 1. Foto), das Tal, das mit bizarren Felsformationen und einer unglaublichen Farbpalette eine der Attraktionen des Nationalparks ist. Es ist allerdings ebenfalls ein Beweis für das, was passiert, wenn der Boden der Witterung schutzlos preisgegeben wird. Berge, Hügel, Verwerfungen stürzen in sich zusammen, und am Ende bleiben sanfte Weiten wie im Nordwesten der Insel, im Westen und Südwesten – hübsch anzusehen, aber lebensfeindlich und leer.

Terminal stage: Horombe plateau insouthern Madagascar - Endstadium: die Hochebene von Horombe im Süden Madagaskar

Terminal stage: Horombe plateau in southern Madagascar – Endstadium: die Hochebene von Horombe im Süden Madagaskar

Die Folgen sind weitreichend und irreparabel. Die Erträge der Landwirtschaft sinken, die Menschen verarmen immer weiter, was nach sich zieht, dass die Bildungsrate stagniert, da Kinder nicht mehr zur Schule geschickt werden können. Fällt Anbaufläche weg, verteuern sich auch die Lebensmittel, was den Leidensdruck weiter erhöht. Darüber hinaus ist die madegassische Tourismusbranche seit dem Putsch 2009 durch eine gestiegene Kriminalitätsrate, die allgegenwärtige Korruption, Meldungen wie der des Ausbruchs der Pest 2014, die Krise bei Air Madagascar und Naturkatastrophen wie den verheerenden Zyklon, der die Insel zu Beginn des Jahres traf, stark geschwächt. Die in weiten Teilen des Landes fehlende Infrastruktur trägt ebensowenig zur weiteren touristischen Erschließung des „achten Kontinents“ bei. Sollten auch die letzten Reste der einzigartigen Flora und Fauna Madagaskars verloren gehen, durch Rodung, Erosion und schlussendlich Verwüstung, dann droht sogar der Kollaps.

Erosion everywhere (western Madagascar) - Überall Erosion (West-Madagaskar)

Erosion everywhere (western Madagascar) – Überall Erosion (West-Madagaskar)

Cirque Rouge, Mahajanga

Cirque Rouge, Mahajanga

Um das Thema, das alle Kontinente betrifft, mehr ins Licht der Öffentlichkeit zu rücken und die Regierungen zum Handeln zu bewegen, hat die Generalversammlung der Vereinten Nationen das Jahr 2015 zum Internationalen Jahr des Bodens erklärt. Es wurden Projekte angestoßen, öffentlichkeitswirksame Aktionen durchgeführt und aufgeklärt. Deutschland beteiligt sich durch das Umweltbundesamt sowie das Bundesministerium für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung. Dieses arbeitet auch schon länger im Zuge verschiedener Projekte mit den Behörden in Madagaskar zusammen. Vornehmlich geht es dabei um den Schutz der verbliebenen Reste madegassischer Flora und Fauna und um nachhaltiges Wirtschaften zum Schutz vor Entwaldung und Erosion. Bleibt zu hoffen, dass es noch nicht zu spät ist; aber da habe ich so meine Zweifel.

Smoke (north of Antananarivo) - Rauch (nördlich von Antananarivo)

Smoke (north of Antananarivo) – Rauch (nördlich von Antananarivo)

Advertisements

7 Kommentare zu “Journey through a mouldering land – Reise durch ein zerfallendes Land

  1. Sehr erschreckend. Danke für den Bericht, das sollte viel mehr erkannt werden, dass dies unwiederbringliche Schäden sind.

  2. sedge808 sagt:

    the colors are excellent

  3. Wunderbare Bilder, die trotz Zerstörung Schönheit vermitteln. Wenn Du unterwegs bist, um dies zu sehen und zu fotografieren – gibt es Gespräche mit den Einheimischen darüber? Ist für sie nachvollziehbar, was du hier berichtest? Dem einen oder anderen?

    • docugraphy sagt:

      Vielen Dank erst einmal! Ja, dem einen oder anderen ist das bewusst. Ohne den direkten Kontakt zu den Einheimischen würde man vieles auch überhaupt nicht mitbekommen.
      Ein erfahrener Führer des Nationalparks Ankarafantsika (1. Bild), der dort bereits seit über 30 Jahren arbeitet, hat uns beispielweise davon berichtet, wie sich das Gesicht von „La Vallée“ von Jahr zu Jahr verändert. Ihm war auch bewusst, dass es irgendwann vollständig verschwunden sein wird, komplett weggewaschen von Wind & Wetter & Erosion.
      Ich bin allerdings weder Missionar noch Entwicklungshelfer. Ich erzähle den armen Bauern und Viehhirten nicht, dass es falsch ist, die letzten Bäume zu fällen.

      • Danke für die Rückmeldung. Vorhanden sein, aufmerksam sein, fragen und zuhören bewirkt ja manchmal auch, dass einem anderen eher bewusst wird, was geschieht, hin und wieder, nicht immer. Da braucht es garkeine Rollenzuschreibung.:)

Kommentar verfassen

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s